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Social Security Disability / SSI

At The Law Office of Stacey Wolcott, we provide our clients with personalized, quality legal counsel in all Social Security and Disability matters throughout Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

With our firm, all of the legal work on your case is done by attorney Stacey Wolcott herself. From your initial interview through your hearing before an Administrative Law Judge, Stacey is with you at every step. The successful outcome of your case is our goal, remember we only get paid when we win your case.

We offer these representational services and more:

Social Security Disability

Social Security pays benefits to people who cannot work because they have a medical condition that is expected to last at least one year or result in death. Federal law requires this very strict definition of disability. While some programs give money to people with partial disability or short-term disability, Social Security does not. Certain family members of disabled workers also can receive money from Social Security.

The five-step process to decide if you are disabled:

1. Are you working?
If you are working and your earnings average more than a certain amount each month, we generally will not consider you disabled. The amount changes each year. If you are not working, or your monthly earnings average the current amount or less, the state agency then looks at your medical condition.

2. Is your medical condition "severe"?
For the state agency to decide that you are disabled, your medical condition must significantly limit your ability to do basic work activities-such as walking, sitting and remembering-for at least one year. If your medical condition is not that severe, the state agency will not consider you disabled. If your condition is that severe, the state agency goes on to step three.

3. Is your medical condition on the List of Impairments?
The state agency has a List of Impairments that describes medical conditions that are considered so severe that they automatically mean that you are disabled as defined by law. If your condition (or combination of medical conditions) is not on this list, the state agency looks to see if your condition is as severe as a condition that is on the list. If the severity of your medical condition meets or equals that of a listed impairment, the state agency will decide that you are disabled. If it does not, the state agency goes on to step four.

4. Can you do the work you did before?
At this step, the state agency decides if your medical condition prevents you from being able to do the work you did before. If it does not, the state agency will decide that you are not disabled. If it does, the state agency goes on to step five.

5. Can you do any other type of work?
If you cannot do the work you did in the past, the state agency looks to see if you would be able to do other work. It evaluates your medical condition, your age, education, past work experience and any skills you may have that could be used to do other work. If you cannot do other work, the state agency will decide that you are disabled. If you can do other work, the state agency will decide that you are not disabled.

You have the right to be represented by an attorney or other qualified person of your choice when you do business with Social Security.

SSI

SSI stands for Supplemental Security Income. The Social Security Administration (SSA) administers this program. SSA pays monthly benefits to people with limited income and resources who are disabled, blind, or age 65 or older. Blind or disabled children may also get SSI.